INTEGRATED WATERSHED AND BIODIVERSITY MANAGEMENT FOR PABITRA SITES: MONITORING TOPO-CLIMATIC GRADIENTS

James 0. Juvik and Sonia P. Juvik 

Geography & Environmental Studies, University of Hawai’i-Hilo 96720 USA

The remaining concentrations of biodiversity and endemism in most of the tropical Pacific high Islands occur in remnant montane forests that also provide important watershed values to lowland human populations. These forest areas are typically under increasing threat from resource extraction, agricultural expansion, alien species invasion and global climate change. Both in equatorial and trade wind latitudes high tropical islands exhibit steep topo-climatic and hydrological gradients that strongly influence local mountain eco-zonation, biodiversity and downstream water supply. These gradients create spatially complex linkages and interaction with slope ,aspect, soil, and vegetation structure. Effective and sustainable watershed and biodiversity management for Pacific Islands is frequently hampered by inadequate meteorological and forest hydrological data (or inappropriate spatial or temporal extrapolation of existing data) necessary for understanding linkages between the atmosphere, vegetation and surface & groundwater hydrology. This paper describes appropriate field monitoring instrumentation ,(including surrogate data sources) and standardized sampling network protocols for better quantifying atmosphere-vegetation interaction (e.g. evapotranspiration, and forest cloud water interception) at PABITRA sites.

 

Abstract from: 43rd Symposium of the International Association for Vegetation Science, July 23-28, 2000, Nagano, Japan.


Return to: IAVS Symposium Abstracts

Last Updated: 08/18/00

PABITRA Home